Home   

  • 3127 Hartzell Street Evanston IL 60201
    42.06568, -87.721876
    PIN: 05-33-419-010-0000
  • Local

    Within Local District?: No

    Local Dist Contrib/Non-Contrib?:

    Local Landmark?: Yes

    Year: 1987

    Local Landmark Eligible?:

    Criteria: A7: Exemplify an architectural style, construction technique or building type once common in the City.

  • National Register

    NR District Contrib/Non-Contrib:

    Within District?: No

    NR Landmark?: No

    Year:

    NR Eligible?: No

    Criteria:

    Alternate Address?:

  • General Information

    Category: Residential

    Condition: Excellent

    Integrity: Excellent

    Current Use: Single Family Residential

    Historic Use: Single Family Residential

    Secondary Structure: Single Car Garage

    NR Second:

  • Architectural Description

    Architectural Classification: Chicago Bungalow

    Details: Arched art glass windows, cross-hatch brick pattern under flower box holders

    Construction Year: 1929

    Other Year:

    Date source: Landmark Nomination

    Wall Material (Current): Brick

    Wall Material 2 (Current):

    Plan: Rectangular

    No of Stories: 1 1/2

    Roof Type: Hipped

    Roof Material: Clay Tile

    Foundation: Undetermined

    Porch: Entry Porch

    Window Material: Wood

    Window Material 2:

    Window Type: Casement

    Window Configuration: Multi Light/Multi Light

    Significance: This one-and-a-half story Chicago Bungalow has massing typical of its type but unified and well-designed; a rounded bay, adjacent to the entrance porch, projects from the basically rectangular structure; arches repeat the rounded shape, porch is entered under a rounded arch with a raised keystone, and the wood doorway just beyond is arched; rounded arches with raised keystones also top the four windows, separated by pilasters, in the front bay; beautiful stained-glass windows with lime green glass form fanlights in the arches; in addition to the arch motif, coloration visually ties the building together; it is entirely of buff-colored brick with light-colored limestone accents; the brick work is set in common bond except where it is used in a basketweave pattern under the windows; the room is sand-colored tile.

    Historic Features: Front dormer window, polygonal bay in front

    Alterations:

  • Historic Information

    Old Address (city dir.year):

    Building Moved?: No.

    Moved From:

    Original Owner: W. G. Mersch

    Original Architect: J. Neebe

    Architect Source: BP #18923 Source: Evanston History Center Archives (3-ring binder)

    Builder: Mason: Johnson & Peterson

    Surveyor: Ian Sission

    Surveyor Organization: The Lakota Group

    Survey Date: 25-Jun-15

    Survey Area:

  • Permit/Historic Information

    Current Address: 3127 Hartzell Street

    Old Address:

    Date of Construction: 1929

  • Permit Moving Information

    Moving Permit #:

    Date Moved:

  • Original Permit Information

    Building Permit #: BP #18923

    Date: 22-Apr-29

    Building Permit Description: 1-story brick bungalow

    Cost: $16,000

    Original Owner Occupied?:

    Exterior Alteration Permits:

    Other Permit Information: 22-April 1929. BP#18939 for a 1-story frame 2-car garage. Owner: W. G. Mersch. Cost: $500. 18-July 1950. BP#27304 for a 1-story brick and concrete screened rear porch addition. Size: 15'W x 15'L x 10'H. Owner: Frank Sammons. Cost: $1,800.

    COA Info:

    Historic Info: Source: Evanston History Center Archives (3-ring binder) STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: A7 In an area dotted with bungalows, this one-and-a-half story brick structure commands attention. Its massing is typical but unified and well-designed. A rounded bay, adjacent to the entrance porch, projects from the basically rectangular structure. Arches repeat the rounded shape. The porch is entered under a rounded arch with a raised keystone, and the wood doorway just beyond is arched. Rounded arches with raised keystones also top the four windows, separated by pilasters, in the front bay. Beautiful stained-glass windows with lime green glass form fanlights in the arches. In addition to the arch motif, coloration visually ties the building together. It is entirely of buff-colored brick with light-colored limestone accents. The brick work is set in common bond except where it is used in a basketweave pattern under the windows. The roof is sand-colored tile. Taken as a whole, this is a particularly handsome example of a prolific building type.

    Other Sources: 18-April 1929 Plat of Survey on file at the Evanston History Center house file.

    Historic Info Compiler:

    Volunteer: Leslie Cousineau, Tony Hurtig

Print-Friendly PDF
© 2019 PlaceVision Inc | Help | Privacy